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Do range hoods have to be ADA compliant?

Do range hoods have to be ADA compliant? - Proline Range Hoods

Range hoods do not have to be ADA compliant. But, many companies sell ADA compliant range hoods to accommodate people with disabilities. ADA compliant hoods feature controls installed separately from the hood. They make running the hood simple and easy. The controls on ADA compliant hoods are either wall switches or a remote, instead of on the hood itself.

Section 309 of the ADA goes over the specific requirements for range hoods.

Range hood controls must be usable with one hand. They cannot require “tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist, or more than 5 pounds of force (lbf) to operate,” according to the ADA.

Range hoods that you can use without a lot of hand movement or pressure are more accessible to people with disabilities.

For wall controls, the maximum high forward reach is 48”. This means that people with disabilities should be able to reach controls 48” (or four feet) above the ground with no trouble.

But most hoods are around 70” or more above the ground (36” to the counter, and 36” between the cooktop and the range hood). That’s why wall switch controls and remote controls are the go-to for adhering to ADA requirements. They make it so people can operate range hoods at any mounting height from a variety of places with ease.

The wall switch controls must be installed separately from the range hood. For safety reasons, people cannot reach across burners to operate their hood.

To view the official ADA code requirements, click on this link.

What is an ADA compliant range or cooktop?

An ADA compliant range must have controls between 15” and 48” off the ground. This ensures that people can reach the controls easily.

Do range hoods have to be ADA compliant? Reach Range for Appliance Controls
https://www.ada-compliance.com/ada-compliance/308-reach-ranges

People must also have room under the appliance for their legs: 25 inches for their feet and knees.

The space underneath the cooktop must be insulated or built to prevent burns, electrical shock, or other injuries. The controls must be operable without reaching over the burners.

For more information, check out section 306 on knee and toe clearance. It includes some diagrams to help you visualize the requirements.

Not all ranges are ADA compliant. If you’re looking for a range online and it doesn’t say anything about “ADA compliance,” it’s probably not compliant.

What does it mean to be ADA compliant?

ADA compliant means that your range hood, stovetop, or other appliance follows the standards outlined by the ADA. These standards were made to accommodate people who cannot operate equipment as it’s typically installed.

ADA requirements for appliances include controls that are installed at a lower, more accessible height. They might also include a remote control to make operating your appliance much easier.

ADA compliance doesn’t just involve appliances. Every area of your home, like your bedroom and bathroom, can also be built with ADA standards in mind.

You’ll also see it come up in schools where students and staff may require ramps and elevators instead of stairs to get around.

What is the ADA?

The ADA is the American Disabilities Act. It’s a civil rights law that was passed in 1990 to give everyone equal opportunity to access public places, schools, operate appliances, and much more.

The ADA also has regulations for websites. Some people have hearing or vision-related disabilities. So, images, alt text, and text-to-speech software may be required, to name a few features.

Hopefully you have a better understanding of range hoods and ADA requirements. To recap, not all range hoods are ADA compliant. But you can find them online. Typically, ADA compliant hoods will feature remote controls. Ranges will require space for people’s legs and feet under the cooktop.

For a full breakdown of ADA regulations in the kitchen, check out this link.

Thanks for reading!

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Do range hoods have to be ADA compliant?

Range hoods do not have to be ADA compliant. But, many companies sell ADA compliant range hoods to accommodate people with disabilities. ADA compliant hoods feature controls installed separately from the hood. They make running the hood simple and easy. The controls on ADA compliant hoods are either wall switches or a remote, instead of on the hood itself.

What is an ADA compliant range or cooktop?

An ADA compliant range must have controls between 15” and 48” off the ground. This ensures that people can reach the controls easily.

People must also have room under the appliance for their legs: 25 inches for their feet and knees.

The space underneath the cooktop must be insulated or built to prevent burns, electrical shock, or other injuries. The controls must be operable without reaching over the burners.

What does it mean to be ADA compliant?

ADA compliant means that your range hood, stovetop, or other appliance follows the standards outlined by the ADA. These standards were made to accommodate people who cannot operate equipment as it’s typically installed.

What is the ADA?

The ADA is the American Disabilities Act. It’s a civil rights law that was passed in 1990 to give everyone equal opportunity to access public places, schools, operate appliances, and much more.

The ADA also has regulations for websites. Some people have hearing or vision-related disabilities. So, images, alt text, and text-to-speech software may be required, to name a few features.
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